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Mildly Enthusiastic Review: Lovesick

You might remember I have a curiosity about romantic comedies which usually leaves me disappointed. But this experience wasn’t too bad, actually.

er-lovesickLovesick (seasons 1–3)

Category: TV shows

Find it on: IMDb

What it is:
A British show centering on Dylan (played by Johnny Flynn, who I’d only known as a good folk singer before) and his two friends, Luke and Evie. Dylan discovers he’s contracted chlamydia, which prompts him to get in touch with all his exes (so many of them) and this becomes a quest for true love and for the answer why it’s so hard for him to find it.

How I found it:
I’m not sure but I think it was on a list of best British TV shows.

Summary judgment:
It’s an enjoyable little pastime, without great depths but no great flaws either.

Best things about it:
It’s a charming little story about three (and then four) imperfect friends guaranteed not to depress you. The gimmicky storytelling works (for me, at least, but I like this kind of thing; give me flashbacks and cold opens and whatever professional TV critics frown upon). Even though Dylan as a character irritates, Johnny Flynn sells him with such unquestionable charm that you have to like him.

Worst things about it:
Personally, I never got behind Evie, which becomes a problem with the main romantic interest. I found almost every other character, including most minor ones, more interesting and definitely rooted more for Abigail (who was great and probably deserved better than Dylan anyway).

Other pluses:
✤ Even when the minor characters come close to caricatures, they usually remain a bit more than that and keep you at least mildly interested in their stories.
✤ How side characters grow on you when they get bigger roles (particularly Angus).
✤ The flashbacks related to the titles of episodes intrigue because you start wondering who each new girl will be (and sometimes the answers turn out surprising).

Other minuses:
✤ As I said, I liked the gimmick for the show’s structure in the first two seasons: Dylan going after all his exes and re-living his romantic life in flashbacks. In fact, when the convention changes in the third season, it becomes less interesting. But sometimes I got really confused as to what happened before what. Probably my fault though and it didn’t really matter all that much.
✤ As, I find, is true of most romantic comedies, it’s not really a laugh-out-loud kind of comedy. It’s still fairly cheerful.

How it enriched my life:
This was a perfect evening watch, letting me go to sleep in a better mood. Too few shows manage to do this.

Fun fact:
So the alternative – or original – title for this show is actually Scrotal Recall. Another proof of how you shouldn’t always go for a pun just because you came up with one (note to self, as well).
Fun fact no 2: the poster doesn’t have a scrawl on it but my son caught my drawing before I scanned it and decided to color it (with the same color so I couldn’t edit it out, not without a lot of hassle). It might look better now though.

Follow-up:
As I understand, the show is over but I think it ran just long enough. I might get back to it one day.

Recommended for:
People who enjoy modern comedies of manners (of sorts, if by manners you mean modes of interpersonal behavior, which I do) and who like their romantic comedies with a large dose of promiscuity. Oh, and fans of the British accent.

Enjoyment:
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

Next time: An Invisible Sign of My Own

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Rotten Tomatoes

Mildly Enthusiastic Review: Your Name

I’m not a great expert on anime – I haven’t even seen a whole lot of classics – but I always enjoy a Miyazaki and often other things too. And the latest thing from this category I had a pleasure to encounter, I enjoyed a lot. (Also, some spoilers, as usual.)

er-yournameYour Name

Category: Movies

Find it on: IMDb

What it is:
A 2016 Japanese animation that was apparently the highest grossing Japanese movie ever, or movie in Japan some time or anime – at least one of those. It made a ton of money, and with a good reason because it’s a beauty. It tells a story of two high school students, one from Tokyo, one from a tiny town, who start switching bodies and living one another’s lives. They also develop feelings for one another in the process and while this would be enough to make a movie, there’s a whole other twist to the story, which raises the stakes halfway through the movie.

How I found it:
Maybe IMDb recommended it but mostly it was R’s choice for a movie night.

Summary judgment:
I loved this movie. It looks so pretty and it makes you feel feelings.

Best things about it:
Its best part is the combination of lovely animation – particularly the detailed, painterly backgrounds – and the actually good, exciting story.
I cared for the main characters and when the time gap twist happens in the middle, it’s quite exciting and makes you root for the characters to succeed.

Worst things about it:
This is not at all the movie’s fault but I suppose it took away from my personal enjoyment a little bit: I feel like I might have missed some parts of the story due to my very subpar knowledge of the Japanese tradition and mythology. Again, it’s completely on me, of course. I did get the red string though.

Other pluses:
✤ What sounds like a silly enough premise manages to become something emotional.
✤ The creators know what they’re doing. Sometimes the chopped chronology makes you think: This makes no sense, but in the end it turns out to make sense once you have more data. Impressive.
✤ I liked some background characters, particularly Mitsuha’s friend.
✤ The contrast between metropolitan and rural territories works great, without overly idealizing one over the other.
✤ The fantastical element is very subtle, it doesn’t hijack the story into a different genre, and so it becomes pretty much mythical rather than just gimmicky.

Other minuses:
✤ Maybe the “your name is” yelling happened one or two times too many. That’s me nitpicking though, not a great habit.
✤ I can see how some of the jokes might be a bit uncomfortable, particularly the one with breasts.
✤ I didn’t love the music but it barely matters.

How it enriched my life:
It surprised me how much I liked it. It also gave me a blurry idea of some Japanese customs I knew nothing about so that now I know very little about them.

Fun fact:
The way I know about the red string of fate is because I used to read soooo many online comics and there was one that included this. (I didn’t read a lot of that one, though.)

Follow-up:
I will return to it for sure and I’ll also check Makoto Shinkai’s other movies.

Recommended for:
People who like anime and even those who are only lukewarm about it. Anybody who likes Japanese storytelling, particularly one involving many illustrations of trains and train tracks. Even fans of romantic comedies who don’t require them to be live action.

Enjoyment:
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

Next time: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

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Bookworming

Queer Romance: Tipping the Velvet

er-tippingthevelvetThe first time I heard of Sarah Waters was when Atwood praised her in a review. I made a mental note to check her out and then forgot about it. Some time later I came upon her described as the author of lesbian Victoriana, which is hardly very respectful but still kind of intriguing (I love Victorian stories, did I mention that?). So when I finally got hold of her novel and it turned out to be exactly that (at least on some level), I both enjoyed that fact and wondered what else Ms. Waters had to offer.

Because if you imagine what “lesbian Victoriana” might look like, you’ve probably hit more or less on the story and feel of Tipping the Velvet. Nancy works in an oyster parlor (yes, I’ll get to that) but harbors love for music halls and it is there that she encounters Kitty, who performs dressed as a man. A pretty standard love affair follows, in which one girl joyfully embraces her new homosexual identity while the other refuses to admit to it, which obviously leads to a (quite predictable) clash – and it is only the beginning (or, you know, first half). The story itself is hardly revolutionary but interesting enough. Waters tries her hand at describing a few different environments of Victorian England: wholesome parochial community, bohemian world of music halls, debauched upper classes and poor-yet-working-for-utopia communist intellectuals. I found all these worlds sufficiently different, colorful and memorable. They also catalyze Nancy’s transformations.

Nancy’s story is a rather generic tale of coming to terms with one’s sexuality, complete with a perfect fairy-tale ending, when everyone comes together and Nancy gets to choose her perfect partner. And I’m not sophisticated enough not to love such a closed, happy ending, sorry. But the real literary wonder happens in the language. The whole story is full of seemingly innocent allusions and jokes that reference current LGBT culture. For example, once Nancy joins the act in male clothing and needs a scenic name, she, quite randomly, decides upon King. One of the characters, though not a warrior princess, is called Zena (with a Z, but still). The word queer appears many more times than statistically likely. Even the oyster parlor, though not exactly a word game, is a similar nod to the reader.

This game, however, has a second side. While modern elements of “queer” culture are, seemingly innocently, incorporated into the Victorian tale, the language of the era also appears. Because it is, I assume, meaningless to the modern reader, the appropriate expressions are explained by the characters as Nancy gets to know her new world. This includes most notably the title, which had it used a more recognizable synonym, would jump out to you from a bookshelf as rather risqué (if not downright vulgar). But because it doesn’t function in the language anymore in its Watersian meaning, we only get the joke once it’s explained by one of the characters.* Playing with slang like this is fun in its own way but also it makes an important point: homosexuality is not only a sexual orientation but also a whole culture that changes with time (even if Waters’ heroines are surprisingly modern in some of their behaviors).

I actually enjoyed this book quite a lot and am looking forward to Waters’ next novels. I have no idea how she could continue with more of “lesbian Victoriana” because Tipping the Velvet pretty much covers it all but maybe she found new ways to tell the same stories or even completely different stories to tell. If you can recommend anything, I will surely try to follow.

* Yes, I suppose you can figure out the meaning by yourself but admit, wouldn’t you, like Nancy, think rather it has something to do with the theater?

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