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Mildly Enthusiastic Review: Emma (1996)

In what is becoming a bit of a habit, I watched another Austen-related thing around Christmas (and yes, it was a while ago but these posts have a waiting list):

Emma (1996)

Category: Movies

Find it on:  IMDb

What it is:
An adaptation of Austen’s Emma, starring Gwyneth Paltrow.

How I found it:
This was actually my very first introduction to the work of Jane Austen. I watched Emma for the first time not long after it was made, on TV one Christmas at my grandparents’. It delighted me to no end and soon after that I read both Emma and Northanger Abbey.

Summary judgment:
It is one of my all time favorites, even if I find it a little superficial.

Best things about it:
It looks so beautiful. It creates this idyllic atmosphere through gorgeous landscapes that really make you want to walk those parks and meadows. I love the light in this movie.

Worst things about it:
Unlike Paltrow, Jeremy Northam doesn’t sell his characters with complete success. He lacks the gravitas that Mr. Knightley should exude: it feels like he’s trying to keep from lighter, laugh-inducing behavior. In fact, this interpretation of Emma focuses on the comedy (and sometimes grotesque) of the story and many characters (for instance the Eltons) and their portrayals fit right in. However, Knightley should stand out from that.

Other pluses:
✤ Gwyneth Paltrow looks lovely as Emma. She’s so aristocratic, with truly impressive body posture. She manages to sell the character completely, both her charm and all her offputting qualities.
✤ Toni Collette, whom I will always love as Tara from the obscure but wonderful United States of Tara, does a great job as Harriet, despite the superficiality of her character.
✤ The movie carries an important quality from the book: it manages to illustrate the challenges and the tedium of having a limited group of people to spend your life around. Almost no one around Emma seems worth developing a friendship with.

Other minuses:
✤ The actresses sport eyebrows plucked in a truly 90s fashion, which I found distracting in the historical setting.
✤ They should’ve used those painted portraits in the end credits. I don’t understand how they missed it.

How it enriched my life:
I had a good time watching it with my husband.

Follow-up:
I will certainly come back to Emma again.

Recommended for:
People who enjoy their Austen with 1990s flavor.

Enjoyment:
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

Fun fact:
No fun and barely a fact but I really hate the new WordPress editor with my whole heart. It’s moronic and doesn’t do anything useful, complicating what used to work well. Ugh.

Next time: Descender comic

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Bookworming

Mildly Enthusiastic Review: Longbourn

You might have noticed already that I tend to devour things created around Pride and Prejudice. So, naturally, I also read

Longbourn by Jo Baker

Category: Books

Find it on: LibraryThing

What it is:
It’s a book that happens around and between the story of Pride and Prejudice or, to put it simply, it’s Pride and Prejudice from servants’ point of view. So naturally it focuses less on new bonnets and marriage prospects and more on all the scrubbing, soaking, cooking and tons of other physical work these require. The main character, Sarah, is one of the housemaids of the original story and Baker imagines the lifestory of hers and other servants.

How I found it:
I think it might have been a list of things to read for Pride and Prejudice fans? Maybe.

Summary judgment:
I enjoyed the book thoroughly, though I’m not unaware of missed opportunities.

Best things about it:
It reads fast and manages to recreate a lot of the magic of the original, without a slaverish attitude towards it. The world feels vivid and believable, even though I suspect some anarchronisms have crept in (not being a scholar of history of manners, I didn’t mind much but the characters’ outlooks felt maybe a tad too modern). I found the description of the servants’ work and the difficulties they face quite enlightening.

Worst things about it:
While, contrary to what I expected, this book is not just a fan-fiction historical romance, it still feels like a bit of a wasted possibility. The idea is just so grand and theoretically allows for such a multi-faceted examination of social and feminist, literary and moral issues of the time. Obviously, taking up a subject like this is, in a way, bound to fail: I don’t imagine a convincing modern rendition of Austen’s wit and artfulness so, I guess, not even attempting it is one way to go. But I kept wishing for something like Alias Grace on the subject: a more prying attempt to disover the intricacies of the mind of a 19th century servant girl.

Other pluses:
✤ I enjoyed the villification of Mr. Bennet. He’s shown as cowardly, cruel and small-minded and I’m glad other people also notice this about such a bafflingly beloved Austen character.
✤ Perhaps what I’ve already written doesn’t emphasize this enough but this really is a good book that doesn’t mostly give in to the temptation of pleasing fan girls.
✤ Both Elizabeth and Darcy are much less delightful in the novel, which I found refreshing.

Other minuses:
✤ I really hated the James chapters. This is perhaps the best example of the lack of subtlety and it completely breaks down the unity of the novel, giving very little in return. As his secret is very easy to figure out, the same exposition could’ve been achieved within the main narrative and with fewer unnecessary details.

How it enriched my life:
It gave me a bit of the Regency fix I sometimes crave and it made for a fun (while not trashy) reading.

Cover notes:
I like the painting they found to encapsulate the theme of the novel but I’m not crazy about the unimaginative (and, frankly, a bit clumsy) way they combined the picture with typography.

Follow-up:
Nothing right now but I’m sure some Regency reading is in my future.

Recommended for:
Pride and Prejudice fans, of course, who always look for more of the story, even those generally discouraged by most fan fiction productions of the sort.

Enjoyment:
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

Next time: Parasol Protectorate

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Gaming Night

Mildly Enthusiastic Review: Regency Love

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a good casual game has no equal in the realm of entertainment.

er-regencyloveRegency Love

Category: Games

Find it on: iTunes

What it is:
A casual iPad game about being a marriageable girl in Regency England ready to fall for (and, of course, marry) a charming bachelor. It was made by Tea for Three Studios (who should get down to it and make more games already). You play by making conversation choices (I love me a text game), which unveils the story (or stories) and answering trivia questions. And, of course, you try to marry as well as you may.

How I found it:
Around Christmas I was in an obsessive Pride & Prejudice mode after having watched the 1995 BBC series for the first time and somehow that led me to the game (I’m not sure how exactly I found it buy I’m glad I did).

Summary judgment:
I got really involved in the game and enthusiastically pursued both available paths (you can buy an extra one but I haven’t so far) as well as some additional minor storylines, all of which gave me great pleasure indeed.

Best things about it:
Spoiler, maybe, but I really liked the storyline of Mr. Curtis, one of the available marriageable men (well, barely) that I pursued on my first play. While not necessarily that exciting in real life, a cranky darkly humorous man will often win my heart in a romantic story.

Worst things about it:
How fast it takes to get through the whole game.

Other pluses:
I really enjoyed discovering the stories and the challenges of both of the main storylines, even though Mr. Ashcroft was too typically attractive to be exciting.

Other minuses:
As in many casual games, the art was not that spectacular. On the plus side, it allowed one to read the general nature of the characters, which, I suppose, was the most important thing, but I found it too hurried and careless to be truly impressed. But I feel rather mean writing it because the whole game is so clearly a work of love and I always appreciate those.

How it enriched my life:
I had perfectly lovely time playing the game, got inspired for creating some light-hearted historical stories and learnt about the tastes of ice-cream in the Regency era, which were quite surprising.

Fun fact:
So apparently the popular ice-cream flavors were parmesan, muscadine and asparagus. I love parmesan but wouldn’t be tempted to try those. And you might think anything would taste good in ice-cream form but that only means you have not tried the tomato ice-cream I once thoughtlessly tasted.

Follow-up:
I would play any similar game or another game by the same studio but so far I haven’t found any. Instead, however, I started GMing a Victorian-themed RPG, which is a far jump, on the one hand, but on the other, an almost direct result of playing Regency Love.

Recommended for:
People who love Jane Austen, historical romances and text-based RPG games without any action scenes in them. (If you’re one of them – write me, we’ll be best friends.)

Enjoyment:
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

Next time: Guardians of the Galaxy, the first one

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